BUSINESSES & VIRUSES: Local business owners adjust to trying times – Part 2

BUSINESSES & VIRUSES: Local business owners adjust to trying times

Korean BBQ keeps same tastes

By David Gomez Jr.
Editor-in-chief
Published Monday, April 27, 2020

[Editor’s note: This is the second in a series of stories on local businesses and how they are coping with the COVID-19 pandemic.]

Korean BBQ continues to serve Laredo one meal at a time, despite the coronavirus pandemic’s impact on its business.

Owner Carrie Park started the business at the Shiloh location under the name BBQ Park, but since then changed the name to Korean BBQ to avoid confusing potential customers. The restaurant currently sits on Del Mar Boulevard, not far from Alexander High School. The change added new customers, including those from nearby Texas A&M International University.

Bridge | Jessica Rodriguez
Korean BBQ is located on East Del Mar Boulevard, not far from TAMIU.

Suddenly, as spring commenced in late March, the U.S. went into self-quarantine and this caused confusion upfront for many. Businesses, especially restaurants, were tackled with the task to remain open, if possible, and feed a hungry nation.

Park said they were ill prepared, but failure was not an option for her.

“Everything seems frozen,” Park said in an email to The Bridge. “The government allows us to serve our food with only take-out options and we have to operate our business with minimal staff.”

This turn of events put a damper on her business, especially in terms of attracting new customers.

“Not only is our staff minimal, but our profit is diminished,” Park added.

As of late April, the staff did not change the menu and the food is prepared the same as before the city ordinances. If anything, they added to it.

“[We’ve] added a meal box that comes with steamed white rice, choice of meat and three side dishes,” Park said in the email. “Something simple, but good enough to cover a full nutritious meal.”

She would like to keep the menu as is, for now, for the sake of her regular customers.

“We will continue to serve a freshly prepared menu, as usual, and we are also trying to introduce some new dishes for the future,” Park emailed.

Korean BBQ’s business hangs in the balance for now, but the owner knows they are not the only ones feeling the pressure of possibly losing a restaurant.

“Not only us, but everyone is having a hard time because of the pandemic,” Park emailed. “We hope everyone will get through it and will get back to our normal life soon.”

For the time being, Korean BBQ remains open for hungry customers willing to give their taste buds a change of pace.

Park emailed, “We appreciate all of our customers who have always supported and continue to encourage us.”

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BUSINESSES & VIRUSES: Local business owners adjust to trying times – Part 1

BUSINESSES & VIRUSES: Local business owners adjust to trying times

Laredo funeral home follows ordinances

By David Gomez Jr.
Editor-in-chief
Published Monday, April 27, 2020

[Editor’s note: This is the first in a series of stories on local businesses and how they are coping with the COVID-19 pandemic.]

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to cause disruption for most local businesses, which are  adjusting to the times and new ordinances.

Fred Dickey Funeral & Cremation Services made adjustments to observe the nation’s quarantine and city ordinances to further prevent the spread of coronavirus at public events. This Laredo business operated under different names, and management, since the 19th century.

Bridge | Jessica Rodriguez
Fred Dickey Funeral & Cremation Services on April 19.

Vice President of funeral and cremation services, and second-generation Funeral Director Fred Dickey III knew it was only a matter of time before it would affect his business in a different way.

At funerals, mourners tend to be affectionate with one another to comfort each other in a time of sorrow. This means handshakes, hugs and kisses on the cheek are prohibited. At least in the meantime. Social distancing, the act of keeping a relatively safe distance of 6 feet or more, is enforced inside the funeral home and parlor.

“You can’t quarantine love,” Dickey said.

“To protect ourselves, and the community, we plan the arrangements with one family member or two, but no more than that,” he said. “We also provide 2 gallons of sanitizer, wear masks and follow further ordinances when they are made known.”

Currently, none of his staff tested positive for the virus or showed symptoms of being infected with the disease, he said.

“Thank God, nobody in our staff has contracted or [gotten] sick [with] COVID,” Dickey said, “and It’s not beneath us to keep people as safe as possible.”

That does not include the sanitizing stations at the entrance of the chapel, which serve like holy water in a Catholic church. They thoroughly clean every pew, toilet seat, sink, doorknob and break room.

Of course, as with many businesses, there are a select few who can enter an establishment. This holds true to funeral homes as well. They only allow immediate family members.

“There is no guest book for 10 people or less,” Dickey said. “Service, or public viewings, can be arranged at a later date if they would like and have burial or cremation now. Some people are traditional.”

For now, under the obituary section on the Dickey website, the funeral service can be seen through a live stream, or private server If the family prefers.

“[In northern areas,] I’ve seen jumbo-trons outside and that was something we didn’t want,” he said. “To have a large gathering outside the funeral home defeats the purpose of social distancing.”

Employees use usher ropes to further enforce social distancing in the parlor.  That includes the departed as well, as there is a barrier between the casket and the family.

“We treat every case as if it were a COVID case,” Dickey said.

“We want to offer the community that they will be safe at our establishment,” he added.

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Sports games a no go; TAMIU athletics continue

Sports games a no go; TAMIU athletics continue

By David Gomez Jr.
Editor-in-chief
Published Monday, April 27, 2020

Dustdevils athletics ceased games and practices due to the coronavirus pandemic, but that is not stopping the department from continuing to recruit, train and be ready to play at any moment. 

With Texas A&M International University on lock down, spring sports programs such as golf, baseball and softball were cancelled for the remainder of the semester. That speed bump did not completely stop the work the Athletics Department continues to do on a daily basis.

“With the majority of our staff and coaches working from home, our coaches are spending most of their time recruiting over the phone and evaluating video of potential recruits,” Athletics Director Griz Zimmermann said in an email to The Bridge. “In addition, [they are] keeping in touch with their current players.

“Most of our administrative staff has continued their normal day-to-day workload, just working remotely … some are still in our offices on campus as essential staff.”

The pandemic, seemingly, came out of nowhere. What started as a noticeable trend in the news and social media, quickly became a full-blown pandemic in less than five months. This generated concern with the administration, faculty and student athletes.

“We are in constant contact with our student athletes,” Zimmermann said in the email. “We are fortunate that the majority of international students were able to make it home safely. Our university has done a fantastic job in keeping faculty, staff and students updated and informed with all matters pertaining to the pandemic and the University community.”

One student athlete who remained on campus expressed concern, taking all the precautions and ordinances seriously, knows the pandemic should not be taken for granted. TAMIU golfer Natchawan “Faii” Serisamran holds optimism the quarantine will come to an end.

“Everyone’s got a rough day,” Serisamran said regarding being stuck in her University Village apartment. “Today might be the worst day, but it will never be worse than this.”

Though, for how long it will continue is the answer everyone seems to be searching. As the self-quarantine continues, so will the cancellation of sports games.

“It is truly unfortunate that the baseball, softball and golf seasons were cut short,” Zimmermann said in the email. “This was exceptionally heartbreaking for our coaches and student athletes who work so hard to compete and represent our university on the field and course. We always look forward to watching the student athletes compete.”

Adding to Serisamran’s hopeful message, Zimmermann added a few words of his own in what many people keep referring to as “these difficult times.”

“We[, the staff,] would like to take this time to once again say, ‘Thank you to all medical personnel, first responders, caregivers and front-line workers for all the work they are doing during this trying time,’” he said. “[We] look forward to the day when we can all be together and celebrate Dustdevil Athletics.”

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Division II football team debate

Division II football team debate

By Karla Juarez
Bridge contributing writer
Published Monday, April 20, 2020

Despite its identity as a popular Texan sport, TAMIU is devoid of a football program. After all, Texas is the only state with an NFL team named after the people who live in it: the Texans.

Texas A&M International University’s Athletic Department offers most of the major sports one can think of. There’s men’s and women’s soccer, volleyball, men’s and women’s basketball, baseball, softball, there’s even a golf team and a cross country team. Nearly every semester, students wonder why TAMIU lacks a football team even though it’s often considered “America’s sport.”

While baseball continues to be called “America’s pastime,” football continues to rise in popularity for the past couple decades. According to a Wall Street Journal article, “From 2000 to 2009, the latest year for which figures are available, the number of kids aged 7 to 17 playing baseball fell 24 percent, according to the National Sporting Goods Association, an industry trade group. Despite growing concerns about the long-term effects of concussions, participation in youth tackle football has soared 21 percent over the same time span, while ice hockey jumped 38 percent. The Sporting Goods Manufacturing Association, another industry trade group, said baseball participation fell 12.7 percent for the overall population.”

“I don’t know why we don’t have a football team in this University, actually,” TAMIU history major Alan Perez said. “Can you imagine how much more publicity and students we would have if we did?

“A couple of friends of mine didn’t come to TAMIU because they didn’t have a football program here and the university they’re at right now does. A football team has, easily, 30 members. That’s 30 more tuitions coming in.”

In actuality, NCAA football teams include up to 125 players but most do not have that many. Of those 125 players, only a maximum of 85 can receive a scholarship.

Some might believe part of this is due to NCAA Div. II regulations: “Division II institutions have to sponsor at least five sports for men and five for women (or four for men and six for women).” TAMIU offers six sports for women, though: basketball, soccer, volleyball, softball, cross country and golf. Men have one less sport than women at TAMIU.

Even one member of the men’s soccer team agrees a football program could bring in more students.

“I think it’ll make Laredo and the University look more attractive and interesting,” business major Luis Diaz said, as translated from Spanish. “Which means more people will want to visit the city and attend the school.”

Another concern opponents hold in regards to adding a football program is the possible rise in tuition costs. There are precedents where tuition spikes occurred in universities and colleges after adding football to the sports roster.

“The Big Game: College Football Stealing Your Education” is a two-minute video citing that “82 percent of college football programs lose an average of $11 million per year.”

This potential tuition increase creates a reluctance to support such a program, like sophomore biology major Yadixa Teran said.

“No, I wouldn’t be OK with it,” Teran said. “We don’t need a football team at TAMIU and when you actually think about it, most of the students here are from a medium- to low-income household. So most of the students won’t be able to afford a rise in tuition.”

Diaz, however, was adamant that the program is needed for future University growth.

“Because in the end, in my opinion, it’s going to bring in more money,” he said, as translated from Spanish. “I’m OK with paying more tuition for the implementation of a football program because it’s going to improve our university by a lot.”

According to the short “The Big Game: College Football Stealing Your Education” the cause of increasing student debt is attributed to college athletic departments, more specifically, their football programs.

“Schools with strong football programs have increased tuition by as much as 65 percent,” according to Scholorships.com.

“In my honest opinion, the team would just be a waste of money,” Yadixa said. “It’s going to cost millions of dollars to just start the program, and it’ll cost much more to keep it going. They should be more focused on keeping students safe by placing cameras on campus, creating new degree programs and hiring more professors than building a new football team from scratch.”

TAMIU junior criminal justice major Alexa Mendoza said the expenses to build a football program are a lot more than most realize.

“Let’s look at what it’ll take to just start a program.,” Mendoza said. “They’re going to need the equipment. So, shoulder pads, helmets, cleats, uniforms, footballs and—oh, yeah, a stadium. Also, let’s not forget the team members and a new football coach, several actually, because it takes more than one coach to train so many members in a sport as complicated as football.

“Now, will the players be protected by an insurance plan in case they get hurt and will they also be offered scholarships? Because if they are, then where is all of this money going to be coming from? Sure, some of it can be state funded, government funded and even funded by donations, but the school, and in turn its students, are going to have to put in most of the money and that’s money the school could be using for more important things.”

Realistically, despite all the speculation, a football program might be out of TAMIU’s reach for the time being.

“A football program is not in the talks right now,” Athletics Director Griz Zimmerman said.

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Coronavirus affects TAMIU campus

Coronavirus affects TAMIU campus

By Maria Reynero
Bridge contributing writer 
Published Monday, April 20, 2020

As the threat of COVID-19 spread, TAMIU’s policy began and continues to be following the regulations and guidelines of the City of Laredo Health Department. Since the initial spread, the campus was partially closed for many activities, face masks are required to enter campus buildings, and other initiatives set forth by Laredo.

A virus which began as a case in Wuhan, China, became an outbreak, and spread to numerous other countries before becoming a global pandemic. The coronavirus, also known as SARS-CoV-2, spread to the U.S. It can be deadly once it causes the COVID-19 disease. Anyone showing symptoms is encouraged to seek medical attention and supervision.

As of April 19, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website indicates the total U.S. reported coronavirus cases at 720,630, including 37,202 deaths. These statistics include all 50 states and several U.S. territories. Texas alone shows 18,260 cases. So far, there are no reported cases in the U.S. territories of American Samoa, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia or Palau.

New York was hit the hardest, showing 233,570 cases and its neighbor New Jersey at 81,436 cases. Most other larger population states are between 10,000 to 36,000 cases each. The smallest numbers for the states are Alaska at only 314 cases and Wyoming with 423 and Montana with 426.

“[The] CDC is closely monitoring an outbreak of respiratory disease caused by a novel (new) coronavirus that was first detected in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China … Reported illnesses have ranges from mild to severe, including resulting in death,” according to the CDC website in February.

Health officials studied the virus to discover its respiratory nature, which makes it faster for people to be severely affected.

“It looks like it’s being spread through aerosol droplets,” TAMIU biology instructor Oscar Ramos said in February 2020. “That’s one of the reasons that it’s highly contagious because there are aerosols that come out of your system, and in those aerosols we have the viral particles themselves so it’s the respiratory route.”

The respiratory system is able to bring oxygen and other particles into one’s body, Ramos said, and so these aerosol droplets are inhaled as well and can contaminate nearby people.

“When there is a health outbreak on campus, whether it’s the flu, the coronavirus or meningitis, we have certain standards that we have to follow so we base ourselves on the practice of the City [of Laredo] Health Department,” Director of Student Health Services Claudia Beltran said. “They are the entity in our community that dictates what we’re going to do in a health outbreak. In this situation like the coronavirus, we have certain guidelines that we follow and the Health Department is very responsible in the fact that they send updates every so often whenever new information comes out.” 

There are certain protocols to take when a virus like this threatens a community. TAMIU officials train to prepare for a variety of health outbreaks on campus. They rely on the Health Department for a variety of necessary actions.

“An emergency response kicks in when there is any type of emergency,” Beltran said in February. “We … basically follow what the Health Department [tells] us in that instance. What we do, we start screening students or faculty or whoever it would be here on campus for symptoms that are indicative for coronavirus.

“In this case, if it were to outbreak then we go into what is called an emergency response. Basically, we would set up like a quarantine and so we would have to isolate certain people. Based on what the Health Department tells us, so if they say we would need to keep people here on campus, the living communities like the dorms or the village is where we would start.”

Since February, TAMIU began to implement plans throughout March as it followed Health Department protocols.

“…not approve any foreign travel by Texas A&M International University students, faculty and staff while the outbreak of COVID-19 remains a dynamically changing and uncertain situation. Summer programs, including exchange programs, are also on hold until further notice,” President Pablo Arenaz told all University employees in an early March email.

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Intramural all-star team faces defeat

Intramural all-star team faces defeat

By Cesar Neira
Bridge contributing writer
Published Monday, April 20, 2020

Short-handedness contributed to a two-game loss for TAMIU’s recreational men’s basketball team during the intramural all-star tournament. The annual National Intramural and Recreational Sports Association Region IV tournament took place from March 7 to 10.

The Recreational Sports Intramural Open Basketball League All-Star team from Texas A&M International University is composed of the best players from the league’s open tournament. TAMIU suffered defeats against Stephen F. Austin and Trinity universities at the all-star event.

The team already faced an uphill challenge due to its shorthanded roster of six players.

This, along with the team being composed primarily of point and shooting guards, the men did not have the highest hopes in regards to making a deep Cinderella run in the tournament.

“We were the shortest team there,” guard Javy Carranza said, following their initial blowout loss to Stephen F. Austin. “We only had one player we could substitute. Despite these challenges, we were gonna do our best to make ourselves proud.”

While the first game ended in a blowout, TAMIU fared better in its second game, against Trinity, which ended in a 54-47 loss.

“We just wanted to represent TAMIU in the best way possible,” starting point guard Nick Martinez said. “Yeah, we know it’s just a rec league, but we just wanted to let the rest of the teams know that they shouldn’t sleep on us.”

The second loss to Trinity ended the weekend for the TAMIU men. The eventual champions of the tournament were the University of Missouri.

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Education students tackle the blocks

Education students tackle the blocks

College relaxes grading system

By Andrea Martinez
Bridge contributing writer
Published Monday, April 20, 2020

TAMIU’s College of Education holds one of the highest graduation rates in the University. However, the College does not allow students who do not pass the teacher certification exams to move on to Blocks II and III of the program.

Up to three blocks exist for education students in order to graduate, yet some students are finding a difficult time graduating due to incomplete blocks.

“We want to demonstrate to the school districts that these students showed that they are knowledgeable in the subject they teach,” Associate Dean Alfredo Ramirez Jr. said. 

The intent of this process is to help students prepare for Block III, as this is the final block necessary to graduate. It is also known as clinical teaching; students acquire field-based experience, which is required by the state. At Texas A&M International University, students who do not pass the certification exam cannot go out and gain this experience.

“It is a very stressful thing,” Ec-6 bilingual emphasis major Elia Diaz said, “since I spent three years of my life dedicated to this major for me to get stuck and not be able to move on.”

Difficulties can increase for students since they need to pass not one but four exams for their teacher certification.

Something that helped relieve students included the return of the grading system to normal.

Ramirez said that it was brought back because “Our students now are performing at a higher rate on the state certification exams,” Ramirez said regarding the change in the grading system.

This lifted some weight off some students’ shoulders.

“It was a relief having a normal grading system [again],” Diaz said. “There were some A’s that I missed because of the grading system.” 

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QUARANTINE CORNER: Dealing with the pandemic – Part 1

TAMIU together: dealing with the pandemic

By Angela K. Carranza
Bridge Staff Writer
Published Monday, April 20, 2020

[Editor’s note: The following is the first installment in a series of articles about different Texas A&M International University students, faculty and staff who are working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic. We hope their stories can be as inspiring to you as we found them to be.]

Daniel Rodriguez
TAMIU senior

During the COVID-19 pandemic, individuals discover how to keep themselves busy in many different ways. For example, some take up different hobbies: cooking, reading, gaming, etc. But for Texas A&M International University senior Daniel Rodriguez, a variety of hobbies keep him occupied throughout the day.

“I have been living alone for quite some time now, which has forced me to cook and be more independent,” Rodriguez said. “I have also gained some hobbies back, such as: gardening, playing Sudoku and playing video games.”

On another note, Rodriguez said life changed when his self-quarantine began.

“In this time of quarantine, I have been thinking about how we often live life in a rush,” he reflected. “This realization made me take more time with things at a slower pace.” 

Submitted photos | courtesy Daniel Rodriguez

Daniel Rodriguez cooks at home during his self-quarantine.

Ruben Reyes
TAMIU sophomore

Quarantine impacts students in many different ways. Some students see it as an advantage to finally beginning the things they had no time for previously, but others find it difficult adjusting to this period of self-isolation. At home, find many distractions.

“My entire routine has completely changed,” sophomore Ruben Reyes said. “It is really hard getting adjusted to this, being at home, 24/7. I was used to going to school at a certain time, going to work at a certain time, and now that we’re stuck at home there’s really nothing I can do.”

In contrast, there are also many things Reyes has been able to dedicate his time to.

“I’ve pretty much been gaming and spending time with my friends online,” he said. “During these last few weeks, I’ve been virtually meeting online with my friends on Discord. We just hang out as if we were hanging out in person, except through Discord.”

Reyes also runs a gaming YouTube account where he uploads gaming videos.

“Lately, I have been able to do more content creation, mainly because I am sponsored by a gaming organization through YouTube, and I did not get the chance to do this as much during the semester because of classes,” he said.

Interested persons may view his YouTube channel: rubenkings.

submitted photo | courtesy Ruben Reyes

Maria Hernandez
TAMIU student

During this self-imposed quarantine, many individuals adapt quite differently.

“Quarantine has mainly impacted me with my schoolwork,” Texas A&M International University student Maria Hernandez said. “It is harder to concentrate because my family is with me all the time. And there are not many places that I could go to do my schoolwork.”

For some, the forced introverted life might seem repetitive.

“Well, basically, [I’m] just doing house chores, homework, watching TV—the minimum stuff,” Hernandez said. “I have also been getting into doing arts and crafts with polymer clay. I usually just decorate things, like I have recently been decorating plant pots.”

She said she is also quite fond of self-quarantine.

“I get to be with my family and live with them,” Hernandez said. “I don’t live with my family, but in this quarantine I have been spending my time with my family.”

submitted photos | courtesy Maria Hernandez

Alyssa Veronica
TAMIU junior

This self-quarantine life has many different impacts on Texas A&M International University students. For some it turns harsh, yet for others beneficial.

“I would actually say that quarantine has benefited me,” TAMIU junior Alyssa Veronica said. “I finally have time to do things around the house. Now I can actually cook. I have been cooking all my meals which is great because I love to cook. And before I hadn’t had the chance to do so because of school.”

“I’m very into nutrition, I like to watch what I eat and find different healthy options that are easy to make,” Veronica said.

In addition, she finds some things too restrictive.

“I think the least favorite thing about quarantine would have to be the restrictions, in terms of going out,” she said. “Like, you can’t go to a friend’s house. You can’t hang out with anybody.

“But my most favorite part about quarantine is that I don’t really have to wake up for class, get ready and find parking. So I would say my favorite part is not having to worry about parking.”

Many students posted about parking issues online in the TAMIU Student Network page on Facebook prior to the impact of COVID-19. 

Veronica turned a not-so-happy situation to her advantage as now finds time to do things she really loves. Despite these “difficult times,” as many people are calling them, some find it important to always look for the bright side in every situation. 

submitted photo | courtesy Alyssa Veronica
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OPINION: Time on our hands

OPINION: Time on our hands

Allison Villareal | Special to The Bridge

ARTIST’S STATEMENT
By Allison Villareal

Bridge contributing illustrator
Published Monday, April 20, 2020

For this concept, I intended to use variety, contrast and movement to demonstrate the overwhelming and uneasy feelings that can be experienced when having too many things in our hands.

I used variety by having hands of many sizes holding different objects that represent time, relationships, health, financial issues, chores, education, entertainment and self care. I used contrast to highlight the dark pressures and stress that can be behind each responsibility that is being held. I used movement to express the variety of weight each hand is carrying.

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OPINION: Being essential these days

OPINION: Being essential these days

EDITOR’S POINT of VIEW
By David Gomez Jr.
Editor-in-chief
Published Monday, April 20, 2020

The coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, causes the disease COVID-19. The ‘rona, as some people are calling it, came fast and deadly. It added pressure to an already fragile economy.

At the front lines of keeping the economy afloat, other than the medical, grocery store clerks, farmers and janitorial staff who deserve so much praise, are also the other “essential” businesses.

I am currently one of those essential workers.

David Gomez Jr.

I work in a hardware store, yet it doesn’t feel essential. I recently went from a part-time to a full-time employee. Nowadays, the type of customers who come into the store are those tired of being at home. It used to be just the casual, usual handyperson customers. Now, they look around and “shop” for the things they need or other things because they found time for their DIY projects.

Though, I am torn down the middle. My first reaction is, “stay at home,” and my second thought is, “I’d go out anywhere if I were stuck in my home and couldn’t handle myself for days in a row doing nothing.”

Times are difficult and as much as we’d like to go out as it were before March 16, we cannot.

Working in an essential field, I feel grateful, but exhausted. Lines stretch out in front of the store. Asking an impatient customer to wait is like telling a river to stop flowing. Those kinds of people want to see you as miserable as they are, but the truth of the matter is that we are miserable, too. At least I know I am.

Tired. Exhausted. Running on three to five hours of sleep a day because college online classes make things even more tiresome. Lethargy sets in and I am suddenly behind. 

“Maybe things will be better if I quit my job,” I think to myself or, “leave The Bridge altogether. I mean, we’re almost at the end of the semester and have switched to online now. No one will read it.”

These are my thoughts when things get difficult. And they have been difficult, but it’s also the only way to show my true character. I don’t want to be known as a quitter.

When I was younger, I was known to give up on many things. I’m not like that anymore. The idea of dropping everything seems like a relief but I am my harshest critic who will criticize every decision ever made. I know for certain I will never forgive myself if I chose to drop it all.

This is not only a test of my own will, but to everyone who is essential and continues to work till their head is pounding. Requests by management to disinfect the area, keep a head count of customers inside the store, make sure I’m wearing protective gear, restock the new materials received, help customer with their needs and my personal favorite, short staffed because my coworker was exposed to the virus and might have it—so they will be quarantined until their results come in.

I wouldn’t wish this virus on my enemies but it all adds up, takes a toll and makes one quite agitated and frustrated.

This is a test of patience for everyone. And no one can cheat off someone else this time. Everyone must keep their head down and give it their all—even from a couch. Take care of yourselves and each other.

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